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10 easy ways to decrease your home energy bill November 2, 2011

Filed under: Home — theecovangelist @ 1:16 pm
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With energy bills constantly on the rise, here are 10 easy tips on how to decrease your home energy use.

1.   Insulate your hot water heater-purchase a water heater blanket or jacket.
2.   Install low flow faucets, shower heads and low flow toilets- low flow toilets consume 30-40% less water.
3.   Hang dry your laundry- this is not only great for cutting energy, but hang drying your clothes makes them last longer as well.
4.   Set your washing machine to use cold water and do a full loadhot-water uses much more energy then warm or cold-water settings.  Also washing clothing in hot-water does not clean them more effectively then warm or cold-water settings.
5.   Plug appliances on a power strip and unplug unused chargers- appliances not in use account for 20% of energy bills.  Plug your appliances on power strips and turn the strip off when you are not using them.
6.   Add more insulation- adding insulation in your walls and attic. Only 20% of homes built before 1980 have proper insulation.  This is a great way to keep your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer.
7.   Install door sweeps- air easily escapes from under your door. Rubber door sweeps are cheap and simple to install and can easily cut on your heating and air conditioning use.
8.   Purchase energy star CFL lights indoors and solar-powered landscape lighting outdoors- outdoor solar lighting cost about $30 and require no electricity and no wires.
9.   Get a portable space heater- if you only need to heat one room for a short period of time, use a portable space heater rather then using central heating. *note if you are going to be in multiple rooms for an extended period of time then central heating might be more energy efficient.
10.  Purchase energy star appliances- these products are approved by US department of Energy and can lead up to 41% less energy use when compared to conventional appliances.

How much does each appliance cost to use?

*Source U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Energy Savers booklet.